MACHINES

13-19-aug3-e1503238968695.pngDocumentary | Germany, India, Finland | 2016 | Hindi

A man shovelling coal onto the flames. We move inside with the camera and we are in the eyes of a person walking through a factory of Gujarat. It is disorientating and promotes dizziness. From white cotton moving off the reel guided by hands to patterned fabric and lace. The dying of fabric. The mixing of chemicals to create colours. Men sleeping in piles of fabric. A man who is carefully moving a 120 kg tub of chemicals tells us that this work requires either muscle power or brains or both. He tells us that he is in debt so has no choice but to travel 1200 km to this factory where he works twelve hours a day. Sometimes with a one hour break before another shift. That on that 30+ hour train journey all he has to eat is dried chickpeas. That he is doing it because how else will he pay for his children’s education? He does not see this work as exploitation. Exploitation, he says, would be if he were forced to be there. He points out that he has come voluntarily. Though he does articulate that poverty is harassment. The factory boss has a different view on things. He says that wages are higher than they used to be. And this has created laziness among the workers. This lies in stark contrast to the experiences of the workers presented here. In one striking scene, workers are questioning the camera, as to what we are actually going to do about their predicament. They comment that researchers have come, politicians have come. All have listened to their concerns, but no-one actually takes any action. They also articulate the crux of the problem. The fact that they are farmers. That they have to purchase their potatos for 20 rupees per kilo. And they sell them for only 5 rupees per kilo. So they have to earn the other 15 rupees per kilo plus money to live somehow, don’t they? There is not a lot of dialogue. A lot of shots took me into the rhythms of different machines or of the work these men are undertaking around the factory. But this still leaves us with the question. Once again, these people have voiced their concerns, but what is changing for them?

Author: roundlyintheeye

A roamer, a learner, a teacher, a flautist, a dancer, a singer, a reader, an art lover, a dreamer, happy to share my writings with you

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